Design & Build Review: Issue 19

In this issue: Designing future cities in 3D, high-rise towers vs low-rise alternatives, innovative ideas for urban vertical farms, living coastal defences, the B10 active house, new designs for LEDs and more


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Design & Build Review: Issue 19 | September 2015

A new project underway in Staten Island is creating a biologically active barrier to protect the island's hurricane-stricken coastline. We take a look at SCAPE / Landscape Architecture's Living Breakwaters vision, which combines coastal resiliency infrastructure with habitat enhancement techniques and community engagement.

Zaha Hadid Architects recently proposed a low-rise high-density development in Mexico despite being asked to design a series of tower blocks, arguing the alternative was more community-orientated. We investigate why the high-rise residential tower continues to enjoy popularity despite having earned a bad reputation in many cities in the past, and take a look at the alternatives.

We also explore an innovative idea for vertical urban farms allowing city-dwellers to grow their food where they live, visit the B10 active house in Germany to look into the future of energy-efficient homes, and round up brilliant new lighting designs using LEDs.

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In this issue

Simulating the City
The vast amounts of data we collect today can change how we plan and design cities. Matt Burgess asks Dassault Systèmes how its data visualisation and 3D mapping software is being used to model the cities of tomorrow.
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The High Life
First-generation high-density residential towers have earned a bad reputation in many cities, but is there a viable alternative to the tower? Chris Lo investigates why urban planners and architects are still looking towards the sky.
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Grown at Home
Vertical farms are increasingly being seen as a solution to urban food supply, but they rarely are tailored to the city they are designed for. Lucy Ingham looks at a remarkable design taking a fresh approach to living and farming in the city.
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Living Defences
Work has started on Staten Island's Living Breakwaters project, a biologically active barrier that will protect the island's hurricane-stricken coastline. Chris Lo finds out how this inspiring ecological vision is progressing towards reality.
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The Active House
The B10 'active house' is out to prove that it can not only produce twice as much energy as it consumes, but also increase the energy efficiency of surrounding buildings.
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Light Evolving Drama
Philippe Starck has said a growing reliance on LED technology will mean designers are "obliged to redesign all lights". We explore some of the latest LED products to get a glimpse of the future of lighting.
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New In
There are always new materials, fixtures and fittings coming onto the market. Here we profile some of our favourites that have emerged in recent months.
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Next issue preview

Design & Build Review is now published monthly with the next issue out in October.

We'll speak to Arup about London's 'green corridor' project and why it's important to incorporate biodiversity into city planning, and weigh up the benefits of low-level housing developments vs high-rise residential towers. We also take a look at augmented reality technology for designers and explore the potential of 3D printing for the construction of new homes. Plus we'll speak to the architects celebrated in Roca London Gallery's exhibition "Urbanistas: women innovators in architecture, urban and landscape design", review the latest in materials, fixtures and fittings and much more.

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