Design & Build Review: Issue 24

In this issue: London's controversial proposed bridge, tackling the UK's construction skills shortage, designing obsolescence-proof smart homes, the career of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and much more


Design & Build Review: Issue 24

Design & Build Review is free for iPad and the web. Download the app to read the latest issue and browse our back issues for free.

In this issue we look at the plans for London's newest bridge, which might be set to improve access for cyclists and pedestrians, but is fiercely dividing would-be users. Now Bystrup has been selected as the preferred bidder, we consider the concerns surrounding the project.

A wealth of smart devices and connected technology can now be installed as a standard part of the average home, but with technology ever changing, how can designers specify without fear of obsolescence? We consider the enormous potential of the smart home, and how obsolescence concerns can be managed.

Plus, with UK Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne committing to the construction of 400,000 homes by 2020, the UK looks set for a house-building boom. But there could be a problem: the chief executive of the Federation of Master Builders is warning of a major shortfall in construction skills.

There's also a look at the career of Scottish Art Nouveau pioneer Charles Rennie Mackintosh, as seen through the defining buildings of his career, as well as a profile of a promising architecture student, which forms the first in a new series. We've also got a round-up of the latest materials, fixtures and fittings.

As always, the issue is available to read for free on iPad through our app, or on a desktop computer using our web viewer.

In this issue

Smart Homes
Despite a range of connected option being available, smart home technology has yet to permeate the mass market. Frances Marcellin looks at the enormous potential of the smart home and considers the best way to tackle fears about obsolescence.
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Clocking Off
While the UK's Chancellor has called for the building of 400,000 new affordable homes, experts are warning that the UK faces a construction skills shortage that could put the plan in jeopardy. Daniel Davies considers how severe the shortage could be, and speaks to Brian Berry, chief executive of the Federation of Master Builders, about what can be done.
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A Bridge Too Far?
A Bystrup Architecture Design and Engineering team has won the competition to design central London's latest car-free bridge for cyclists and pedestrians. Julian Turner walks us through the winning commission.
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A Career in Buildings: Charles Rennie Mackintosh
Charles Rennie Mackintosh was perhaps the most notable architect to ever come out of Scotland, and the main figure in the UK's Art Nouveau scene. We look at the defining buildings of his career, which have influenced architects across Europe to this day.
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Future Greats
Each month we'll be looking at the work of a highly promising architecture student. This month is Chew Kah Heng, who is studying for a bachelor in architecture degree at Universiti Sains Malaysia's School of Housing, Building and Planning.
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New In
With new materials, fixtures and fittings emerging all the time, there's a vast range to choose from for projects. We select some of our favourites from the last few months.
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Next issue preview

In the March issue we'll be looking at the challenge that is the sensitive restoration of older buildings, as well as considering how sustainable future city design is being taught to the architects of tomorrow.

We'll also investigate the US' updated building codes, developed in response to research into tornado damage, and ask whether rabbit hutch homes are a sad necessity or an avoidable issue.

Plus we consider the Zaha Hadid-designed Heydar Aliyev Centre's innovative use of wood, and look at the career of Dutch architect Aldo van Eyck through his most iconic buildings.

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