Design & Build Review: Issue 34

In this issue: How Weston Williamson is creating a modern, inspiring space for scientific research in Cairo, the key to sensational social housing, 2016's reinvention of public spaces and much more


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2016 has, in many ways, been an excellent year for architecture. Although it saw the death of Dame Zaha Hadid and a host of controversial and in some cases unworkable projects, there has also been much the industry can be proud of.

In particular, this has been an excellent year for public spaces, with dazzling new cultural buildings constructed in numerous countries around this world. In this issue we look at the projects that have transformed cultural and public spaces in 2016, and consider how these buildings reflect the year’s wider architectural trends.

2017, however, is likely to deliver even more architectural marvels, including the new Science City complex set for construction in Cairo, Egypt. We speak to architects Weston Williamson to discover the challenges and goals of the project.

Housing, and in particular social housing, has been a hot topic in many parts of the world over the last year, and will likely continue to be over the next 12 months. However, while much of the discussion has been negative, there are projects bringing new ideas to social housing. We speak to Le Tour Way lead architect Richard Johnston to find out how the project broke the mould.

We also look at the newly revealed design for the UK Hydrographic Office, which takes a “one team” approach without resorting to open-plan, and consider the architectural career of the pioneering but somewhat forgotten designer Eileen Gray.

Plus we profile some of our favourite new materials, fixtures and fittings, and consider the portfolio of a promising architecture student.

As always, the issue is available to read for free on iPad through our app, or on a desktop computer using our web viewer.

In this Issue

Cairo’s Science City: A vision of the quest for knowledge
In the desert on the Western edge of Cairo, a new 125,000m2 Science City will be designed by UK architecture studio Weston Williamson. We find out how the project team is creating a modern, inspiring space for scientific research and learning that respects the culture and history of its location.
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2016 in Architecture: Reinventing the Public Space
This year saw a number of high-profile cultural and public spaces open to the public around the world. We ask what these projects reveal about the architectural trends informing the design of these essential urban resources.
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The Key to Sensational Social Housing
The Le Tour Way residential development in York, UK has been recognised for exceeding the standards usually expected of social housing schemes. Atkins architectural associate Richard Johnston, who led the design of the project, lends his insight on the factors that made this development both appealing for residents and affordable for City of York Council.
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Building Relationships
When the UK Hydrographic Office said that they wanted a building that encourages a “one team” approach, perhaps what they imagined they would be getting was something open plan. But architecture firm AHR envisaged a design that helps build a team ethos, while maintaining a modern and design-centric approach. We take a look.
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A Career in Buildings: Eileen Gray
Best known for her pioneering furniture design, Eileen Gray has rather unfairly been forgotten by architecture, despite playing a defining role in the development of modernist architecture. Here we look at her impressive career through some of her most significant architectural projects.
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Future Greats
Every month we look at the portfolio of an architecture student or recent graduate that we think is destined for greatness. This time it’s the turn of a student from Paris, France, whose unusual take on conventional briefs has greatly impressed us.
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New In
As tastes change and technologies develop, new materials, fixtures and fittings are always being produced. We highlight some of our favourites from those that have appeared in the last few months.
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Next issue preview

In the next issue of Design & Build Review, out in January, we’ll be considering the rapid return to popularity that brutalism has enjoyed over the last few years. We’ll look at why this is happening, and whether it’s a reflection of wider changes in society.

We’ll also ask whether it is time to rethink housing for the elderly, and look at the projects breaking the mould.

Plus will consider the architectural evolution and social role of the humble garage, and review the impact Ludwig Mies van der Rohe has had on the industry.

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