Imperial College London to develop new hall of residence


Imperial College London in the UK has purchased 1.8 acre site in North Acton to develop a new hall of residence for its undergraduate students.

The site is set to become home to a development with 700 beds, and is slated for completion in September 2020 subject to planning permission.

The building will be located on Wales Farm Road, close to the college’s existing accommodation at Woodward Buildings, as well as North Acton Underground Station and the new Crossrail station due to open next year.

Imperial College London provost professor James Stirling said: “At Imperial, we are committed to enriching the wider student experience, as well as providing a world class educational experience.

“We know that students based in Woodward Buildings are enjoying the facilities on offer, and I’m pleased we will be able to offer that experience to more of our students in the future.”

The new hall will support the college’s proposal to offer accommodation to all eligible first year undergraduates in addition to providing extra bed space.

The development adds to Imperial’s existing student community of around 900 living in Woodward Buildings, as well as the nearby Costume Store development.

"This new development will be a great addition to our accommodation portfolio and will enable us to offer a greater range of cheaper bed space for our students."

Students living in the planned residence will have access to existing public facilities at Woodward, including a restaurant and bar.

The college will work with students to develop the look and feel of the communal spaces for the new halls.

Campus Services director Jane Neary said: “Like Woodward Buildings, the new hall will meet the demand from students for single en suite rooms in purpose-designed accommodation.

“This new development will be a great addition to our accommodation portfolio, and will enable us to offer a greater range of cheaper bed space options for our students.”


Image: Imperial's Woodward Hall at North Acton. Photo: courtesy of Imperial College London.