A Facade Fabric for a New Style of Architecture

At last building facades have been redefined with the introduction of a new textile facade fabric.

Combining vibrant colours with the unique performance derived from an exclusive Précontraint method of manufacture, which offers excellent dimensional stability, high UV resistance while ensuring a prolonged life in the harshest of Australian environments.

The fabric has been developed from 25-plus years experience in the textile architecture and solar protection industries, ensuring robustness and long term durability. The flexible and lightweight properties of the membrane offer the benefits of rapid installation and unique versatility for new construction or renovation applications.

It has also been designed with environmental benefits in mind being 100% recyclable, and boasts excellent solar protection properties resulting in reduced energy usage, tremendous natural light control and lower embodied energy impacts.

The brief from our client when refurbishing their building was visual impact but more importantly the solar protection of the glazed area while reducing costs of energy usage by not having to run air conditioners to their usual capacity. They wanted the natural light control and the outward transparency while ensuring visual privacy for those looking from outside. They were also conscious of the environment wanting to use a recyclable product. Initial tests by the client have proven a considerable drop in internal temperatures and UV radiation with up to 14 degree Celsius reduction in glass temperature measured by an infrared temperature device.

The emerging field of façade construction through the use of technical textiles offers massive advantages to architects and building owners with the ability to reinvigorate tired old structures or new buildings, and at the same time having an impact on our global footprint.

This product is available from Architectural Sails who are regarded as one of Australia’s
market leaders in high quality membrane structures and shade structures.