Design & Build Review: Issue 3

27 March 2012 (Last Updated March 27th, 2012 18:30)

Metropolis re-imagined: As many of our cities rapidly outgrow their capacity, architects are redefining the concepts of urban space.

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Cities are constantly evolving, shaped by the demands of modern life and the visions of today’s city planners. But with the population predicted to reach nine billion by 2050, the cities as we know them may soon outgrow their capacity.

In this issue we explore the solutions architects are thinking up to provide sustainable urban spaces for future generations. From efforts to regenerate Brazil’s chaotic metropolises to the water-sensitive designs that are set to solve water management issues in cities the world over, we investigate how the design-build world is gearing up to transform urban life. We also look at fantastically futuristic designs that could soon see an entire city rising up in a mega-skyscraper, or a self-sufficient urban ecosystem floating like a giant lilypad in the ocean.

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In this issue

Transforming Space
As population numbers continue to skyrocket and cities outgrow their capacity, architects have to adjust their ideas of urban space. Elisabeth Fischer explores some of the concepts aimed at tackling the problems that will be faced by tomorrow’s cities.
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A Sensitive Approach
The sustainable integration of water into our cities will be one of the biggest challenges faced by urban planners. Elisabeth Fischer explores some of the water-sensitive design strategies that have been laid out to help secure city life for future generations.
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Old Meets New
Historic buildings are an integral part of today’s cities and their preservation has become a very basic element of architecture. Elisabeth Fischer discovers what it takes to successfully blend old and new structural designs in a modern metropolis.
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Head in the Cloud
After years of delay, controversy and intrigue, Massimiliano Fuksas is on the cusp of realising his grandest project to date. LEAF Review editor Phin Foster meets the outspoken Italian to discuss Berlusconi, Alexander the Great and why cinema is more important than architecture.
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A Sprawl to Enthral
Brazil’s metropolitan areas are facing a host of infrastructural and social problems that emerged from an era of explosive urban growth. LEAF Review’s Rod James speaks to Rafael Brych and Alexandre Hepner of Arkiz and MMBB’s Milton Braga of MMBB about the future of Brazilian urbanism.
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A Natural Paradigm
The eVolo Magazine Skyscraper Competition has been rewarding unique and imaginative designs since 2006. We explore the concept for a truly remarkable 2011 entry, Recipro-City, which could open up a new solution to urbanisation.
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Rising from the Ocean
It reads like a blueprint from a modern Utopia: As a man-made island, floating in the Pacific Ocean like a giant lilypad, Botanical City could become a fully self-sufficient, carbon-neutral ecosystem housing a million people by 2030. We explore the concept behind Japan’s futuristic metropolis.
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Next issue preview

In times of economic uncertainty, the design-build industry relies on advanced technologies to deliver projects on time and on budget. In the next issue we explore 4D building information modelling and other essential tools engineers are using today. We also investigate the boom of Brazil’s construction industry, look at the world’s largest surge barriers under construction in New Orleans, and find out how a mini spider crane helped to build London’s new Shard tower from the top.

The next issue will be out in May. Sign up for your free subscription to get it delivered directly to your inbox.

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