City of London approves Cheesegrater 2 skyscraper plan

11 July 2018 (Last Updated July 11th, 2018 12:26)

The City of London Corporation in the UK has approved Lai Sun Development Company’s plan to construct a new skyscraper, called Cheesegrater 2, at 100 Leadenhall.

City of London approves Cheesegrater 2 skyscraper plan
City of London Corporation approves 100 Leadenhall Street office tower. Credit: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and Cityscape.

The City of London Corporation in the UK has approved Lai Sun Development Company’s plan to construct a new skyscraper, called Cheesegrater 2, at 100 Leadenhall.

The building will be 263.4m-high upon completion, thereby becoming the third tallest building in the Square Mile.

The project was approved by the corporation’s planning and transportation committee.

This project will see the demolition of existing developments at 100, 106 and 107 Leadenhall Street, which are to be replaced by the development of a 56-storey building.

Around 6,300 workers are expected to work in the building upon completion.

This building will have more than 102,000m² of office accommodation, basement showers, cycle parking and ground-floor retail space, as well as two podium terraces and a public viewing gallery on the top two floors.

“It is vital to continue to deliver office space for the significant growth expected with the arrival of the Elizabeth line later this year.”

The first level of the gallery will offer panoramic views across the city while the top floor will provide views to the south, hosting up to 360 guests at a time.

100 Leadenhall Street will be one of the seven tall buildings in the city’s eastern cluster that are set to finish construction by 2026.

This skyscraper project will offer an increase in flexible office accommodation in the city.

New routes through the skyscraper will enable the public to benefit from more navigable and less congested network of the city streets.

The City of London Corporation’s planning and transportation committee chairman Chris Hayward said: “As a leading business district accommodating 483,000 workers every day, it is vital to continue to deliver office space for the significant growth expected with the arrival of the Elizabeth line later this year.

“Leading to a church dating back to the 12th century, this development demonstrates the City’s distinctive ability to house the old and new side by side, while becoming more accessible to creative workers and members of the public. More than ever we are seeing businesses make location decisions based on the quality of the built environment and public realm that they can offer their employees.”

The corporation meanwhile has launched a public consultation on proposed improvements to the tall office building area of the city, called as the ‘eastern cluster’.

Among the proposals include increased pedestrian priority across the area and the creation of flexible spaces that support changing working patterns, including the deployment of ‘smart benches’ featuring mobile charging facilities.