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September 17, 2018

Westbank completes revamp of BIG’s Serpentine Pavilion, Toronto

Canadian real estate developer Westbank has completed the reconstruction of Bjarke Ingels Group’s 2016 Serpentine Pavilion in Toronto.

Canadian real estate developer Westbank has completed the reconstruction of Bjarke Ingels Group’s 2016 Serpentine Pavilion in Toronto.

Measuring 46ft in height and 39ft in width, and 88.5ft in length, this unzipped structure of fibreglass bricks will display large-scale models of ten Westbank projects in an exhibition titled ‘Unzipped’.

This exhibition is open to all from 15 September to November, reported Architectmagazine.com.

The pavilion was disassembled in London after its run by the Serpentine Gallery in 2016 and then brought to the Canadian capital for re-assembly.

For the first time, the Serpentine Pavilion was brought to North America.

Unzipped is held to display a collaboration between developer and architect. It showcases the design in association with the landscape, city and the environment.

This structure is made of 1,802 stacked fiberglass bricks.

"I think we tried to make a structure combines many differences."

Westbank founder Ian Gillespie was quoted by Canadianarchitect.com as saying: “Regardless of the city we’re operating in, we view beauty as an indispensable integral aspect of architecture alongside durability and utility.

“We challenge the thinking that there is not a synergy between architecture and beauty, by infusing accessible art and culture into every project for residents and visitors to experience.”

The entrance of Pavilion will let the visitors be introduced to Gesamtkunstwerk or total design concept.

For this exhibition, BIG is using the modular fibreglass bricks as shelves for ten projects and placing large-scale models. The project showcases design principles that blend with the Pavilion’s geometry.

BIG founder Bjarke Ingels was quoted by Canadianarchitect.com as saying: “We liked this idea that, quite often, interesting things happen when you change seemingly incompatible elements and you combine them into a new hybrid.

“I think we tried to make a structure, that in an effortless way, combines many differences.”

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