View all newsletters
Receive our newsletter - data, insights and analysis delivered to you
  1. News
December 11, 2017updated 13 Dec 2017 1:00pm

Construction begins on world’s tallest timber tower in Norway

Norwegian timber specialist Moelven has announced the start of construction of the world’s tallest timber building Mjøstårnet.

Norwegian timber specialist Moelven has announced the start of construction of the world’s tallest timber building Mjøstårnet.

Free Report
img

Assess the market with our Construction Risk Index (CRI)

The global construction industry is in the process of recovering from the unprecedented disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, due largely to the policies enacted to contain the spread of the virus. Although recovery is underway, there are still major risks stemming from new waves of COVID-19 infections and the reintroduction of restrictions on economic activity. Nevertheless, GlobalData predicts global construction output to grow by 5.3% this year. Global recovery in the construction industry will be far from uniform, and GlobalData’s Construction Risk Index (CRI) provides a standardized view of the country-level risks facing the construction industries in 92 major developed and emerging markets around the world. The CRI focuses on 4 key risk pillars, these being:
  • Financial risk
  • Political risk
  • Economic risk
  • Market risk
In the latest update of the CRI, the model has been adjusted so that certain elements of economic and market risk assess a country’s performance relative to its pre-Covid-19 setting, so to give the most accurate assessment. Check out our Construction Risk Index to get a complete view of the current market in the wake of COVID-19 disruptions, and best position yourself for the future.
by GlobalData
Enter your details here to receive your free Report.

The 80m-tall mixed-use building is being built in Brumunddal town, an hour and a half’s drive north of Oslo. It is named after the country’s largest lake, Mjøsa.

The 18-floor building will include apartments, an indoor swimming pool, a hotel and restaurant.

Mjøstårnet is claimed to be 30m higher than the existing world’s tallest timber building. Construction is scheduled to be completed in December next year.

Moelven Industrier Group investor and contracting client Arthur Buchardt said: “Mjøstårnet sets new standards for timber constructions. The building is the closest we come to a skyscraper in timber.

“Studies show that building with wood instead of concrete can reduce CO2 emissions by up to 30%.”

“The assembly and construction of the Mjøstårnet is nothing short of world-class engineering and will be managed without external scaffolding, despite the complexity of working at heights.

“We are primarily using cranes and supplementing with lifts as needed. We have reached 33m to date, meaning we have 50m to go.”

As part of the project, Moelven will supply the timber required to build the tower and the swimming pool area from local forests.

Buchardt further noted: “A project group established by Norwegian road authorities investigated the possibility of building the world’s longest timber bridge across Lake Mjøsa.

“Their studies show that building with wood instead of concrete can reduce CO2 emissions by up to 30%.

“I want to help convey an important message with this project. To build with wood is to contribute to the world breathing better. Through Mjøstårnet we demonstrate that it is possible to construct large, complex wooden buildings.”

It is important to Buchart that raw materials are locally sourced, so timber comes from nearby forests.

Related Companies

Free Report
img

Assess the market with our Construction Risk Index (CRI)

The global construction industry is in the process of recovering from the unprecedented disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, due largely to the policies enacted to contain the spread of the virus. Although recovery is underway, there are still major risks stemming from new waves of COVID-19 infections and the reintroduction of restrictions on economic activity. Nevertheless, GlobalData predicts global construction output to grow by 5.3% this year. Global recovery in the construction industry will be far from uniform, and GlobalData’s Construction Risk Index (CRI) provides a standardized view of the country-level risks facing the construction industries in 92 major developed and emerging markets around the world. The CRI focuses on 4 key risk pillars, these being:
  • Financial risk
  • Political risk
  • Economic risk
  • Market risk
In the latest update of the CRI, the model has been adjusted so that certain elements of economic and market risk assess a country’s performance relative to its pre-Covid-19 setting, so to give the most accurate assessment. Check out our Construction Risk Index to get a complete view of the current market in the wake of COVID-19 disruptions, and best position yourself for the future.
by GlobalData
Enter your details here to receive your free Report.

NEWSLETTER Sign up Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. The top stories of the day delivered to you every weekday. A weekly roundup of the latest news and analysis, sent every Monday. The industry's most comprehensive news and information delivered every month.
I consent to GlobalData UK Limited collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy
SUBSCRIBED

THANK YOU

Thank you for subscribing to Design Build Network