BIG reveals designs for 2 World Trade Center in lower Manhattan, US

9 June 2015 (Last Updated June 9th, 2015 18:30)

Danish architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has revealed design concepts for 2 World Trade Center to be developed by Silverstein Properties at Lower Manhattan in New York City, US.

WTC 2 BIG

Danish architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has revealed design concepts for 2 World Trade Center to be developed by Silverstein Properties at Lower Manhattan in New York City, US.

Set to be an office building more than 80 storeys high, the development will be the headquarters for 21st Century Fox and News Corp, reports Wired.

Design of the iconic skyscraper will involve seven separate building volumes in varying sizes.

Architect Bjarke Ingels said: "It will appear like a vertical village of singular buildings stacked on top of each other."

Each section of the high-rise will be set back from the previous one to acheive the staggered style, with the overall structure extending around 38,000ft² of outdoor terraces.

The building will be developed at 200 Greenwich Street and rise up to 1,340ft, framing the 9/11 Memorial Park beside the first, third and fourth WTC developments.

"It will appear like a vertical village of singular buildings stacked on top of each other."

"On one hand it's about being respectful and about completing the frame around the memorial, and on the other hand it's about revitalising downtown Manhattan and making it a lively place to live and work," Ingels added.

The flat-topped building will lean towards the city's tallest skyscraper, 1 World Trade Center, which stands at 1,368ft without the spire. 2 WTC will have 2.8 million ft² of rentable space, and the upper half will be open for leasing to other commercial tenants.

The office building's base will hold a major portion of the 56,000ft² site, being home to TV studios and 100,000ft² of retail space.

It will also include a 38,000ft² lobby connecting the building to the World Trade Center transit hub.


Image: An artist rendering of 2 World Trade Centre. Photo: courtesy of BIG.