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June 17, 2014

Chetwoods designs 1km-high Phoenix Towers in China to tackle pollution

UK architectural firm Chetwoods Architects has proposed designs for The Phoenix Towers, which will be built in Wuhan, China, to address pollution problems.

By Rohit

UK architectural firm Chetwoods Architects has proposed designs for The Phoenix Towers, which will be built in Wuhan, China, to address pollution problems.

The two giant towers will reach 1km in height, surpassing the current tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, to become the tallest pair of structures in the world.

Phoenix Towers is part of an ambitious environmental master plan for Wuhan, which is situated on the Yangtze River at the crossroads of nine provinces, and has recently been designated as an environmental super city by the regional and Central Government of China.

"We’ve applied as many environmental ideas as we possibly could to justify the shape and the size of them."

The towers will be built on 7ha within the project’s 47ha site, which sits on an island in a lake.

The two towers, Feng and Huang, will have unique personalities and attributes, claims the company.

The environmental features include lightweight photovoltaic cladding, thermal chimneys, suspended air gardens, wind turbines, water harvesting / recycling, waste recycling via biomass boilers and hydrogen fuel cells at ground level.

Additionally, the towers will generate their own power while contributing to the surrounding district.

The taller tower will contain multiple filtration systems for cleaning the water from the lake and the surrounding air, as well as solar electricity plants. The other will feature a perforated facade with a louvre system for ventilation and light control, a vast vertical garden, restaurants, galleries, bars and other leisure facilities.

Chetwoods Architects founder Laurie Chetwood was quoted by Dezeen as saying that China wanted to take the Eiffel Tower experience a stage further.

"It doesn’t just stand there and become an iconic symbol of Wuhan, it has to do a job. We’ve applied as many environmental ideas as we possibly could to justify the shape and the size of them," Chetwood said.

Chetwood expects the construction work to begin within next year and completion in three years.

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