Osborne starts construction of library at Roehampton university in London

27 January 2016 (Last Updated January 27th, 2016 18:30)

Osborne has started construction works for a £24m library development for the University of Roehampton in southwest London, UK.

Osborne has started construction works for a £24m library development for the University of Roehampton in southwest London, UK.

The developer had won the construction contract in July 2014, which includes plans for a four-storey tall building inside the university campus.

Expected to be completed and opened by late 2017, the new library will offer more than 1,000 study spaces.

Osborne senior project manager Chris Hickman was quoted by the Construction Index as saying: "Breaking ground is always an exciting moment for us. After many months in the design and planning stages, it's fantastic to be making those first physical steps towards delivering, what will become, a library that will benefit so many in the years to come."

"Expected to be completed and opened by late 2017, the new library will offer more than 1,000 study spaces."

University of Roehampton estates director Ghazwa Alwani-Starr said: "We're pleased to see work getting under way on the site and working with Osborne we're looking forward to watching it rise up in the centre of our campus during the next 18 months."

Creagh Concrete has also landed up with a £5m contract for the library construction, reports The News Letter.

The firm will be responsible for constructing an architecturally exposed concrete frame with brick-faced precast panel façade for the new building.

Osborne is also responsible for £43m Library and Student Services Centre development for the Royal Holloway University in London.

The firm is using 3D Ground Penetrating Radar for the £2m expansion of the project, which can help in generation of a fully realised underground view prior to the initiation of the upgrade works.

Osborne project director John Richardson said: "The 3D Ground Penetrating Radar really is a fantastic tool. It's letting us safely explore the ground beneath our feet, giving us a fully detailed view of what will be required."