Tate Modern art gallery in UK to open in June 2016 following revamp

23 September 2015 (Last Updated September 23rd, 2015 18:30)

The expanded Tate Modern art gallery in the UK will open to the public on 17 June next year, following a £260m revamp.

Tate Modern in 2000

The expanded Tate Modern art gallery in the UK will open to the public on 17 June next year, following a £260m revamp.

Developed by architects Herzog & de Meuron, the building will feature a gallery for modern art making it the 'most important new cultural building' in the country for more than two decades.

Mace is the construction manager for the new extension building, which will stand at ten storeys-high, offering 60% more display space than the original Tate Modern inaugurated in 2000.

The new development will have the Turbine Hall at its centre, with the existing six-storey Boiler House on one side and the new ten-storey brick-clad Switch House on the other.

Tate said: "The new Switch House is now structurally complete, with work focusing on the interior fit-out and the unique brick facade.

"It will offer a spectacular variety of spaces for visitors and for art, from the raw industrial tanks to a panoramic roof terrace overlooking the London skyline."

"It will offer a spectacular variety of spaces for visitors and for art, from the raw industrial tanks to a panoramic roof terrace overlooking the London skyline.

"There will also be new urban spaces to the south and west of the building, completing the site's transformation from a closed, industrial ruin to an open, public space."

The project, expected to be completed by February 2012, has already exceeded the £215m cost estimate set in 2006.

It now includes renovation works for the existing building, with a re-evaluated total cost of £260m.

The Tate Modern extension has been backed by cultural fundraising campaigns and received financial support from the UK Government, the Greater London Authority, and other private foundations and individuals.


Image: Original Tate Modern was inaugurated in London in 2000. Photo: courtesy of Christine Matthews / Wikipedia.