Vinci to build £54m Life Sciences building for Bristol University

1 February 2012 (Last Updated February 1st, 2012 18:30)

Vinci Construction UK has secured a contract from the University of Bristol for the construction of a new £54m Life Sciences building in Bristol, UK.

Vinci Construction UK has secured a contract from the University of Bristol for the construction of a new £54m Life Sciences building in Bristol, UK.

The contract requires Vinci to build the 13,500m² building, which has been designed by architects Sheppard Robson at the heart of the university precinct.

The construction works, which are scheduled to commence in April 2012, will see Vinci transform the corner of St Michaels Hill and Tyndall Avenue.

University of Bristol bursar Patrick Finch said: "We have great confidence that Vinci Construction UK, working closely with our project managers and designers and the Estates Office Capital Projects team, will be able to deliver an outstanding result for the University."

"The regeneration of this key area of the precinct will help fulfil a long-standing ambition in the University’s Estate Masterplan and the new public realm should be a delight for staff, students and visitors alike," Finch said.

The contractor will divide the Life Sciences building into three zones, including a five-storey laboratory wing complete with spectroscopy and microscope rooms, acoustic chambers, a double height plant room, green houses for plant studies, and clean rooms.

Vinci will also oversee public realm works and extensive landscaping which will link St Michaels Hill and Tyndall Avenue to Royal Fort House and its adjoining gardens.

Molecular Plant Pathology professor Gary Foster said: "The new building will also provide outstanding laboratories for science teaching and will enhance the undergraduate experience by facilitating research-led study and staff-student interaction, making Bristol University the first choice for research and teaching."

The site previously housed the 1960s Focus Centre, two blocks of houses, and the disused ward blocks of the Old Children’s Hospital. Listed frontage of the hospital will be retained as part of the 21st Century learning and research facilities for the School of Biological Sciences.

The main construction works are set to be complete by the end of 2013, enabling the building to be occupied at the beginning of 2014.