University of Calgary starts construction of Mathison Hall

4 May 2020 (Last Updated May 4th, 2020 12:02)

The University of Calgary in Canada has started the construction of Mathison Hall, a new building for its business school Haskayne School of Business.

University of Calgary starts construction of Mathison Hall
An artist’s impression of the Level 1 atrium looking north. Credit: Diamond Schmitt and Gibbs Gage.

The University of Calgary in Canada has started the construction of Mathison Hall, a new building for its business school Haskayne School of Business.

The C$90m ($63.81m) project includes the construction of a four-storey 10,000m² Mathison Hall building, as well as other renovation works to the Haskayne School of Business’ current campus Scurfield Hall.

Once complete, the project will provide around a dozen new classrooms, which will be equipped to seat from 40 to 100 pupils. In addition, the expansion will also feature new spaces for study, group work, student advising, food services and events.

It will help the business school to grow, as Haskayne aims to have 4,000 students across its Bachelor of Commerce, MBA, Master of Management, PhD and DBA programmes.

Construction work is expected to be completed in September 2022.

Haskayne dean Jim Dewald said: “This is a critical time for the school to expand in support of our strategic growth and bold vision and will add significant capacity for unparalleled learning, innovative research and meaningful community engagement.

“We are creating a home for our students and bringing all business classes back to the business school with new places to collaborate, study and learn.”

The project was first announced by the University of Calgary in 2018. Since its announcement, the expansion project received C$28m ($19.85m) in donations. Several other business leaders and alumni have also invested in the project.

The University of Calgary also noted that construction protocols were updated to maintain social distancing rules and other guidelines currently effective due to the Covid-19 pandemic.