Arup and Argos develop new WeatherShift tool for building owners

13 May 2014 (Last Updated May 13th, 2014 18:30)

UK-based engineering services firm Arup has partnered with Argos Analytics to develop a new WeatherShift application that allows building owners to assess building and urban performances based on climate conditions.

UK-based engineering services firm Arup has partnered with Argos Analytics to develop a new WeatherShift application that allows building owners to assess building and urban performances based on climate conditions.

WeatherShift comes at a time when the world is witnessing a rise in average global temperatures due to climate change, resulting in shifts in weather patterns.

According to the company, these climate changes will impact the energy use, water stress and the comfort of buildings and their urban environments.

To meet future challenges, Arup and Argos have developed a tool that generates future climate weather data for 50 cities based on climate simulations run for the recent IPCC Fifth Assessment.

The companies used a timer series adjustment, or morphing technique, to generate 8,760 hourly weather data.

Cities and building owners can use this data to assess the impact of climate change on a particular building or location.

"This is a perfect example of how climate science pairing with practice can improve our cities and communities." 

The tool will also be used to minimise building owner's risk from increased operational costs, so they can make more informed investment decisions during the initial design phases of major infrastructure projects.

Additionally, designers can plan buildings that can respond to impacts of climate change and maintain their core service.

The latest version of the WeatherShift application adjusts weather data for years 2046 to 2065 and 2081 to 2100, at user-defined points on the distributions for both the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emissions scenarios.

Arup associate principal Cole Roberts said the company is excited about how it can use WeatherShift to benefit projects and clients.

"Designs that have had to use historic data can now be complemented by future data derived from multiple global climate models," Roberts said.

Argos Analytics chief technical officer and IPCC Fourth and Fifth Assessments lead author William Collins said: "This is a perfect example of how climate science pairing with practice can improve our cities and communities."