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Crossrail plans office building above Farringdon Station in UK

20 Jun 2012 (Last Updated June 20th, 2012 18:30)

Crossrail, along with development partner Cardinal Lysander, has submitted a planning application before the London Borough of Islington and the City of London to construct a six-storey office and retail building above Farringdon station.

Farringdon station office building, Crossrail

Crossrail, along with development partner Cardinal Lysander, has submitted a planning application before the London Borough of Islington and the City of London to construct a six-storey office and retail building above Farringdon station.

The 207,000ft² mixed-use building would be built at the western entrance of Farringdon station on the corner of Cowcross Street and Farringdon Road.

Designed by John Robertson Architects (JRA), the building would offer office space on the upper floors and retail units at street level.

Crossrail Land and Property director Ian Lindsay said: "Our proposed developments will accelerate the area’s regeneration, helping Farringdon re-emerge as a destination in its own right."

Crossrail has already signed a number of collaboration agreements with landowners to deliver the over-site developments, including Grosvenor Estates, Great Portland Estates, Derwent London, Cardinal Lysander Group and Aviva Investors.

The building will be designed to integrate with Crossrail’s rail station at Farringdon and improve local views of St Paul’s Cathedral.

Crossrail expects that by 2018 Farringdon will be one of UK’s busiest rail stations, linking Crossrail, Thameslink and London Underground services.

Farringdon station will provide a direct link to three of London’s five airports, providing a railway connection between Heathrow and Gatwick.

After completion of the rail line, over 140 trains per hour will pass through Farringdon.


Image: The building will offer office space on the upper floors and retail units at street level. Photo: Crossrail