Obayashi completes world’s tallest broadcasting tower in Japan
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Obayashi completes world’s tallest broadcasting tower in Japan

01 Mar 2012

Construction firm Obayashi has completed the construction of the $806m Tokyo Sky Tree broadcasting tower in Japan, two months late due to the quake and tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011.

Tokyo Sky Tree in Japan

Construction firm Obayashi has completed the construction of the $806m Tokyo Sky Tree broadcasting tower in Japan, two months late due to the quake and tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011.

Located in the Narihirabashi / Oshiage area, of the Sumida district in the capital city Tokyo, construction of the tower started in July 2007, and was originally planned to be 610m high, which was later increased to 634m.

Designed by the Japanese architectural firm Nikken Sekkei, the tower has a triangular pyramid shape base, two observation decks at 350m and 450m above ground, as well as 300 shops and restaurants, an aquarium, planetarium and a dome theatre.

It features a 375m high and a 8m diameter central internal pillar made of reinforced concrete, which is built to act as a cushion during earthquakes, and an anti-seismic design that includes underground pilings spread out like the branches of a tree.

The tower comprises an outer steel frame and an inner shaft of reinforced concrete that can move separately and cancel out their seismic energies.

The vibration control system of the tower employs a central column similar to the design used in the pagodas of traditional Japanese architecture in order to stabilise the structure. .

It will become a hub for terrestrial digital TV and radio broadcasting, and can be used as an observation tower.

The Tokyo Sky Tree tower is now the second tallest building in the world behind the Burj Khalifa (829.8m) in Dubai, UAE and is taller than the 600m Canton Tower in China’s Guangzhou and the 553m CN Tower in Toronto.

The tower is scheduled to open to the public in May 2012 and is expected to attract about 25 million visitors a year.

Image: The Tokyo Sky Tree tower (634m) is the second tallest structure in the world after the Burj Khalifa (829.8m) in Dubai, UAE. Photo: Nikken Sekkei.