San Francisco Museum of Modern Art breaks ground on expansion project
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San Francisco Museum of Modern Art breaks ground on expansion project

30 May 2013

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) in the US has broken ground on its $610m expansion project.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) in the US has broken ground on its $610m expansion project.

The 225,000ft² expansion project will add a new ten-storey facility along the back of the current building at 151 Third St.

After completion, the new building will house a glass-walled gallery facing Howard Street to give views of some of the museum’s artwork from outside.

Designed by the architectural firm Snøhetta, the project includes the addition of 41,000ft² of public space and 130,000ft² of indoor and outdoor gallery space.

Plans also include a vertical garden to be located in a new outdoor sculpture terrace on the third floor and a ‘white box’ space on the fourth floor.

Conservation studios will be situated on the seventh and eighth floors, with an outdoor terrace, also on the seventh floor, offering views of the city.

New public spaces and additional public entrances to the building on Howard and Minna Streets will be designed to increase access to the museum.

SFMOMA said the project will expand education programmess for school children, deliver more galleries to host live performances and large-scale works of art, and make field-leading contributions to global standards of energy efficiency for art museums.

Sustainable features in the project will reduce energy costs by 15%, water-use by 30% and wastewater generation by 20%.

Construction on the expansion project is due to start this summer and is expected to be completed in 2016.

The project is expected to achieve LEED Gold certification from the US Green Building Council.


Image: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art on Third Street. Photo: Courtesy of Caroline Culler (Wgreaves).