San Francisco Public Utilities Commission completes HQ
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San Francisco Public Utilities Commission completes HQ

21 Jun 2012

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) in the US has completed its new headquarters building at 525 Golden Gate Avenue in San Francisco.

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) in the US has completed its new headquarters building at 525 Golden Gate Avenue in San Francisco.

The building has a floor area of 277,500ft² spread across 13 storeys and cost $201.6m including construction, design, permitting, planning and moving.

It will house 900 employees of the commission; the employees are expected to move to the new building in July and August 2012.

The building will consume 32% less energy compared to an office building of comparable size, and will use hybrid solar array and wind turbines to generate up to 227,000kWh of power per year, meeting 7% of the building’s energy requirement.

A raised flooring system has been incorporated in the building’s data and ventilation infrastructure to allow it to reduce the energy costs for heating, cooling and ventilation by 51%.

SFPUC general manager Ed Harrington said: "The unique hybrid wind-solar installation combined with the use of onsite, recycled wastewater makes 525 Golden Gate one of the most self-sustaining buildings anywhere in the world."

The structure will consume 60% less water and reduce carbon footprint by 50% compared to similar-sized buildings

Water treatment systems installed in the building will help in treating all its wastewater, which can be used in low flow toilets and urinals.

The building’s rainwater harvesting system can store up to 250,000 gallons of water per year for use by exterior irrigation systems.

The structure, which is expected to achieve LEED Platinum certification, also features a green concrete mixture using environmentally-friendly materials.

Post-tension systems incorporated in the building’s core will also allow it to absorb seismic shock.