Zaha Hadid redesigns Tokyo’s 2020 Olympic stadium following protest

8 July 2014 (Last Updated July 8th, 2014 18:30)

UK-based Zaha Hadid Architects has redesigned the stadium for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, after around 500 people staged a protest against the project's design and cost.

UK-based Zaha Hadid Architects has redesigned the stadium for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, after around 500 people staged a protest against the project's design and cost.

The project was also criticised by Japanese architects, including Fumihiko Maki, Toyo Ito, Kengo Kuma and Sou Fujimoto, who complained that the 80,000-seat stadium is too big and would go against Tokyo's urban planning strategies.

As per the original design, the stadium would have displaced public housing residences and the 1964 Olympic stadium in Kenzo Tange.

"The design has been refined to optimise the investment and make the stadium even more efficient, user-focused, adaptable and sustainable."

Japanese sports minister Hakubun Shimomura estimated the project to cost JPY300bn (£1.8bn) and forced the Japan Sports Council, the government body that organises the competition, to reduce the project to JPY169bn (£970m).

A Zaha Hadid Architects spokesman was quoted by bdonline as saying that the design has been refined to optimise the investment and make the stadium even more efficient, user-focused, adaptable and sustainable.

"All projects around the world go through this process of design evolution and refinement and we are working closely with the client and our Japanese colleagues throughout the process," spokesman said.

"Lightweight, tensile fabric between the stadium's structure significantly reduces the weight and materials of the roof, giving the stadium even greater flexibility as both an outdoor and indoor venue."

The firm also assured critics that the stadium can be used for hosting conferences, concerts and exhibitions after the Olympics Games.

The Spokesman said: "Its scale is a direct correlation to the project brief's seating capacity of 80,000 to meet the client's requirements for flexibility and capacity, enabling the greatest future use by Japan's sporting, cultural, civic and community organisations. No construction works or redevelopment will be required for use after 2020."